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Citizens Cymru Wales hold Living Wage protest at Cardiff Airport

Supporters of a campaign initiated by security workers at Cardiff Airport held a protest today calling for the airport to become an accredited Living Wage employer - and ensure that all airport workers are lifted out of poverty pay. 

The protest took place on the 1st of May, International Workers' Day, and coincided with the first Qatar Airways flight touching down at Cardiff Airport - the first long-haul link connecting Wales to the Gulf.  

Campaigners have awarded the 'Jammy Dodger Award of the Year' for Publicly-funded Poverty Pay to Debra Barber, the Airport's CEO, to highlight the fact that the Airport has gotten away with paying poverty wages to over 100 security staff for 4 years under Welsh Government ownership. The award was delivered to Yvonne Murray, the Head of HR at the airport, who will hand it to Debra Barber. 

Father Michael John and Father Jesse Smith hand the Jammy Dodger Award of the Year for Publicly-funded Poverty Pay to Yvonne Murray, Head of HR at Cardiff Airport.

Debra Barber has recently admitted that there would be at least another 2 years of poverty wages until staff are paid the real Living Wage, which is independently calculated by the Living Wage Foundation based on what employees and their families need to get by. The Living Wage is currently set at £8.75 per hour and rises over time depending on changes to the cost of living. 

Campaigners have also asked Ken Skates AM, the Government's Cabinet Secretary for Transport,to explain why Cardiff Airport has yet to accredit as a Living Wage employer when it has been funded by public money since 2015 after the Welsh Government spent £52 million to buy it.

Supporters of the campaign have been tweeting Ken Skates AM and Debra Barber - you can add your voice here.

If you live in Wales you can also contact your local Assembly Member and ask that the Welsh Government does right by working people - especially when paying for this raise in salary would cost the Government a fraction of what it has already invested in the airport.